Tag Archives: Year of the Rooster

The Celebration of Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year is probably the most important date in the Chinese calendar, with the event being celebrated throughout China and in Chinese communities around the world. Gold plays an essential part of the Chinese New Year celebrations.

Also known as Lunar New Year, the date on which Chinese New Year falls each year is variable since it follows the Lunisolar calendar, hence the New Year festival is a movable event. However, Chinese New Year usually falls somewhere between 21 January and 21 February and the date is calculated based on the occurrence of a new moon.

This year, Chinese New Year is on Friday 16 February and marks the beginning of ‘Year of the Dog’ and the completion of the preceding ‘Year of the Rooster’. The Chinese calendar follows a 12-year repeating cycle and is also associated with 12 animals of the Zodiac (Sheng Xiao), with each year in the cycle represented by a different animal. The Year of the Dog is the 11th year in the Zodiac cycle. Next year in 2019, Chinese New Year falls on 5 February, and marks the beginning of the 'Year of the Pig', the final year of the cycle.

The 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac (Sheng Xiao)

People born in the upcoming Year of the Dog are said to be loyal, honest and friendly with a sense of responsibility as well as being intelligent, independent and decisive. And across China, dogs are also considered auspicious and associated with good fortune.

New Year's Day in China also marks the beginning of the Spring Festival. During Spring Festival, there is a 7 day public holiday across mainland China, beginning on Lunar New Year’s Eve and ending on the 6th day of the new lunar year. This year, the New Year public holiday starts on 15 February and lasts until 21 February. The actual Spring Festival then continues and runs up to the 15th day of the new lunar month which coincides with the traditional Lantern Festival. This year the Lantern Festival is on Friday 2 March.

Customs and Traditions across the Spring Festival

Chinese New Year celebrations are predominantly associated with the colour red. Red is traditionally thought to bring good luck and good future while scaring away evil and bad fortune. This tradition is associated with the story of a mythological beast Nian which in Chinese folklore was scared off by the use of red items and loud noises. Hence New Year’s celebrations incorporate red bunting, red hanging lanterns, dragon dances and loud displays of fire crackers, and its also common in China to see red cloths hanging at the entrances to houses during New Year’s festivities. Wearing red clothes is also popular over the festival and is thought to bring good luck.

In China, the New Year festivities incorporate various customs and traditions symbolising the renewal of a new year, the passing of an old year, and the cultivation of good luck. In the week before New Year, people traditionally clean their houses as a way of cleaning out the old. New Year is also a popular time to purchase new items as it signifies a new beginning and the welcoming of a new year.

The gifting of money-filled red envelopes is also popular during New Year across China. These gifts are thought to bring good luck to the recipient, hence they are known as lucky red envelopes. An amount containing the number 8 is particularly auspicious as the number 8 is thought to be lucky and bring prosperity. But apart from the money, the red colour of the envelope is also associated with good fortune.

Reunion Dinner is one of the most important family occasions in the Chinese calendar

The days leading up to New Year are a time of immense travel within China with millions of people on the move as they return home to their families and relatives to celebrate. A particularly important event during this time is the traditional ‘Reunion Dinner’ which takes place on New Year's Eve, and is a traditional dinner celebrated together with family.

Gift Giving for Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year is also one of the most popular times in China for buying physical gold, gold for gift giving, but also for investment given that it's an auspicious time of the year. At the retail level, Chinese gold demand at this time of year sees a noticeable peak as people across China rush to buy gold bars and buy gold coins, especially for gifting.

This is particularly true of gold coins and gold bars with a Lunar New Year theme, a Zodiac animal theme, or that have an association with China. At BullionStar, we have a wide selection of gold coins and gold bars which would make impressive gifts for Chinese New Year for both family and friends.

PAMP Lunar Series 2018 Year of the Dog Gold Bars

Swiss gold refinery PAMP is one of the best known and most prestigious gold bar brands on the market and is especially popular across Asia. This year PAMP celebrates  the 'Year of the Dog'  with a beautifully designed high relief gold bar portraying a dog motif on both the front and the reverse of the bar's surface. These Lunar gold bars are ideal for gifting and for celebrating the good fortune associated with Chinese New Year.

Available in both 100 gram and 1 ounce weights, PAMP's Lunar minted gold bars contain .9999 pure gold and capture the dog's symbolic qualities of loyalty and friendship. The intricate design on the front face features a portrait of an adult dog sitting in front of a kennel. The reverse of each Lunar gold bar cleverly reveals, through a reverse angle of the same scene, a puppy in the kennel sheltered behind the parent dog.

The bars reverse face is also embossed with PAMP’s refinery logo, the weight and purity of the bar, the bar’s unique serial number, and the Swiss assay mark and guarantee of authenticity Essayeur Fondeur.

PAMP Suisse 2018 Year of the Dog Gold Bar

Each PAMP Lunar gold bar comes in a distinctive and secure assay card

Royal Canadian Mint MapleGram 8

The MapleGram 8 from the Royal Canadian Mint is a particularly stylish set of 8 Maple Leaf gold coins presented within an attractive red and gold display card and designed around a Chinese New Year theme. Each of the 8 gold Maple Leaf coins weighs 1 gram and contains 9999 fine gold. Each of the 8 coins in the set also has its own unique 8 digit serial number. The red and gold design of the MapleGram 8 signifies luck and good fortune, while the presence of 8 coins references the auspiciousness of the number 8 in Chinese culture.

MapleGram 8 from the Royal Canadian Mint

Perth Mint Gold Lunar 2018 - Year of the Dog

Another attractive gift option for Chinese New Year are the very popular Lunar themed bullion coins from Australia’s Perth Mint, which for 2018 celebrate the Year of the Dog. These coins are the 11th in the Perth Mint’s current series of Lunar bullion coins.

The Perth Mint’s 2018 Gold Lunar coin is available in 6 weight denominations, namely 2 oz, 1 oz, 0.5 oz, 0.25 oz, 0.1 oz and 0.005 oz, each of which is minted from 0.9999 fine gold. The 1 oz 2018 Gold Lunar has a maximum mintage of 30,000 pieces. The reverse of the Lunar gold coin features a stylish and detailed image of a Labrador Retriever with the Chinese character for "Dog", and "Year of the Dog" is a circular inscription underneath.

Perth Mint Lunar gold coin 2018 - Year of the Dog

Perth Mint Lunar Silver 2018 - Year of the Dog

Also in celebration of Chinese New Year, the Perth Mint has produced a 2018 'Year of the Dog' Silver Lunar coin available in weight denominations of 0.5 oz, 1 oz, 2 oz, 5 oz, 10 oz, and 1 kg, all of which contains 99.99% silver and have a superior finish. The reverse of the 2018 Silver lunar celebrates the new Zodiac with a handsome portrayal of a German Shepherd dog and pup. The coin also displays the Chinese character for "Dog", with a circular inscription underneath of "Year of the Dog". While gold is more popular for gifting at New Year in China, silver coins, especially the bigger ones such as the 1 kg Silver Lunar for 2018, can also be gifted.

In addition, the Perth Mint has also released a Year of the Dog 1 oz proof version of the 2018 Silver Lunar which comes in its own box with a certificate of authenticity, and a Year of the Dog 1 oz proof high relief 2018 Silver Lunar also with its own box and certificate of authenticity.

China Gold Panda Coins

In terms of gold bullion and China, Chinese Panda gold coins are undoubtedly the most famous Chinese gold product on the international market, and would make interesting gift ideas for Chinese New Year. Minted in China by Shenzhen Guobao Mint, this Mint is part of China Gold Coin Corporation, which in turn is owned by the Chinese State.

30 gram Chinese Gold Panda coin 2018 - Year of the Dog

Each year the design on Chinese Gold Panda coins changes, with the reverse of the new 2018 coin featuring a powerful portrait of a Giant Panda feeding on a bamboo shoot. The front of each Gold Panda coin features imagery of the Hall of Prayer for Abundant Harvests in the Temple of Heaven in Beijing.

Gold Panda coins are produced in 5 weight denominations ranging from the flagship 30 gram Gold Panda coin, through to Gold Panda coins weighing 15 grams, 8 grams, 3 grams and down to a 1 gram gold coin. The 30 gram Gold Panda coin, weighing the equivalent of 0.965 troy ounces, is always a popular seller and would make a New Year’s gift to remember. Given that 8 is the luckiest number in China and is associated with prosperity and good fortune, the 8 gram Gold Panda coin is also of interest during the New Year festival.

Heraeus 1 kg Silver Lunar Stacker Bar

The Year of the Dog is also celebrated in a new 1 kg Silver Lunar Stacker Bar from the world-famous Heraeus precious metal refinery in Germany. Each of these 1 kg (32.15 ozs) Heraeus Silver Lunar bars contains 99.9% pure silver and has the words “2018 Year of the Dog” embossed on the bar's front surface along with the bar's weight and fineness “1 Kilo” and “999 FINE SILVER” which encircles a stylised representation of a dog.

Heraeus 1 kg Silver Stacker Bar 2018 - Year of the Dog

The reverse of each of these silver bars features an anti-forgery swirl pattern design for added security, and displays the bar's unique serial number. The Heraeus Silver Stacker bar is designed for easy storage and comprises rectangular beveled surfaces that interlock for ease of stacking.

1 oz Silver Happy Chinese New Year - Lion Dance

Also of interest for Chinese New Year is a 1 oz proof silver “Happy Chinese New Year - Lion Dance” coin produced by Victoria Mint on behalf of the Republic of Chad. The silver coin’s reverse features a colorized depiction of a traditional Chinese Lion dance which is synonymous with good luck and fortune, and the Chinese characters ‘新年快樂’ meaning ‘Happy New Year’. This proof silver coin has been produced by the Mint in a very limited issue of just 1000 coins. Each coin comes with a certificate of authenticity and is presented in a red velvet casing and outer box.

BullionStar’s Extensive Range of Royal Mint Gold Coins and Silver Coins

BullionStar carries an extensive range of investment grade gold bullion coins and silver bullion coins minted by Britain’s famous Royal Mint. The Royal Mint is fully owned by Her Majesty’s Treasury and has the distinction of being the world’s oldest mint.

BullionStar’s range of Royal Mint bullion coins includes gold and silver Britannia coins, gold and silver Lunar coins, and gold and silver Queen’s Beast coins. The Lunar and Queen’s Beast bullion coins are quite recent additions to the Royal Mint’s bullion coin range, and they substantially extend the choice of Royal Mint bullion coins now available to BullionStar customers.

Gold and Silver Britannia

The flagship of the Britannia range is the handsome 1 troy ounce Britannia gold coin, which since 2013 has been minted in 0.9999 fine gold. From its launch in 1987 until 2012, the 1 ounce gold Britannia coin was minted in 22 carat gold (0.9167 fine). In 2015, the Royal Mint also introduced fractional dominations into the Britannia gold coin range in ½ oz, ¼ oz, and 1/10 oz weights.

The latest 2017 issue of the gold Britannia coin commemorates the 30th anniversary of the coin’s launch in 1987, so for some investors, this year’s issue may hold some extra historical significance.

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1 ounce gold Britannia coin, 2017

The Royal Mint also issues a 1 ounce Britannia silver coin, which since 2013 has been minted in 0.999 pure silver. Prior to 2013, the silver Britannia was minted in 0.958 pure silver. The 1 ounce 2017 Britannia silver bullion coin is also the 20th anniversary of the coin’s issue as it was initially launched in 1997.

In addition, the 2017 gold and silver Britannia coins both contain a new security and design feature in the form of micro inscribed radial lines on the obverse of the coin, which are configured as an intriguing radial sunburst pattern behind the Britannia figure.

The Britannia name is derived from imagery of Britannia featured on the reverse face of these coins. The current Britannia imagery displays a standing female symbol of strength embodied in the naval tradition and was designed by English sculptor and coin designer Philip Nathan.

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1 ounce silver Britannia coin, 2017

Although gold and silver Britannias are non-circulation coins, all gold and silver bullion Britannia coins are still classified as legal tender in the UK. For example, the 1 oz Gold Britannia is legal tender with a face value of GBP 100. As legal tender, all Britannia’s are exempt from UK VAT and UK Capital Gains Tax.

Gold and Silver Lunar

In 2014, the Royal Mint launched a new series of gold bullion and silver bullion coins to celebrate the 12 signs of the Chinese zodiac.

Officially called the Shēngxiào Collection, this series is more commonly known as the Royal Mint’s Lunar series. Each of the 12 coins in the series features imagery of animals of the Zodiac on the reverse face of the coins. The imagery has been designed by British Chinese artist Wuon-Gean Ho. The gold Lunar is minted from 99.99% pure gold and is issued in the 1 troy ounce and 1/10 ounce denominations. The silver Lunar coin is minted from 99.9% pure silver and is issued in a 1 ounce denomination.

Each of the gold and silver Lunar series consists of one new coin design per year. The series began with the Year of the Horse in 2014, the Year of the Sheep in 2015, the Year of the Monkey in 2016, and most recently the 2017 gold Lunar Year of the Rooster, a coin which features an attractive design of a Marsh Daisy Rooster. The forthcoming 2018 Lunar design will celebrate the Year of the Dog.

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1 ounce gold Lunar coin, Year of the Rooster 2017

Royal Mint Lunar gold bullion and silver bullion coins are also legal tender in the UK, and, for example, the 1 oz gold Lunar coin has a face value of GBP 100.

Gold and Silver Queen’s Beasts

In 2016, the Royal Mint again expanded its bullion coin range with the addition of the Queens Beasts series minted in gold and silver. The images on this series of coins, which were designed by Royal Mint engraver Jody Clark, are based on statues of 10 heraldic beasts that were commissioned for Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation ceremony in Westminster Abbey in 1953. These statues were themselves based on the extensive history of British royal ancestry and heraldry associated with the British monarch.

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1 ounce gold Queen's Beast coin, Red Dragon of Wales 2017

In gold, the Queen’s Beasts gold coin is available in a 1 troy ounce weight of 99.99% pure gold and a 0.25 troy ounce weight of 99.99% pure gold, while in silver, the Royal Mint has opted to produce a 2 ounce coin minted to a very high 99.99% pure silver standard. This 2 oz silver coin is the Royal Mint’s highest purity silver coin to date.

The Queen’s Beast gold and silver bullion coin range will ultimately consist of 10 coins, with an average of 2 different designs of new legendary creatures issued each year. The first three bullion coin designs launched so far are the 1 ounce Lion of England gold coin, the 1 ounce Griffin of Edward III gold coin, and most recently the 1 ounce Red Dragon of Wales gold coin. Also currently available are a 0.25 ounce Red Dragon gold coin and a 0.25 ounce griffin of Edward III gold coin.

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2 ounce silver Queen's Beast coin, Read Dragon of Wales 2017

Likewise in silver, the Royal Mint has so far issued a 2 oz Lion of England silver bullion coin dated 2016, a 2 oz Griffin of Edward III silver bullion coin dated 2017, and a 2 oz Red Dragon of Wales silver bullion coin dated 2017.

The Royal Mint has now shared with BullionStar the coin design titles and scheduled release dates for the remaining seven legendary beasts in the Queen’s Beast series, which are as follows:

  • 2017 September            The Unicorn of Scotland
  • 2018 March                   The Black Bull of Clarence
  • 2018 September            The Falcon of the Plantagenets
  • 2019 March                   The Yale of Beaufort
  • 2019 September            The White Lion of Mortimer
  • 2020 March                   The White Horse of Hanover
  • 2020 September            The White Greyhound of Richmond

Note that the Royal Mint has also issued a limited-edition proof 10 oz silver Lion of England coin dated 2017 which is the largest weight silver coin ever issued by the Royal Mint.

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Obverse face of 1 ounce gold Britannia coin, 2017

While the reverse faces of the above gold and silver bullion coins feature imagery of Britannia, Lunar zodiac animals, or Queen’s Beasts, respectively, the one consistent feature of all of these coins is that their obverse coin face features a head portrait, or effigy, of the reigning British monarch Queen Elizabeth II. Royal Mint coins issued since 2016 feature a contemporary head portrait designed by the Royal Mint’s engraver Jody Clark. Up until 2015 for a number of years, the portrait used a portrait designed by well-known sculptor Ian Rank Broadley.

Singapore GST and Investment Precious Metals (IPM)

A key driver of gold and silver bullion coin sales in Singapore is whether a particular bullion coin is exempt from Singapore’s Goods and Services Tax (GST). Qualifying coins are defined as Investment Precious Metals (IPM) by Singapore Customs.

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1 ounce gold Queen's Beast coin, Griffin of Edward III 2017

Gold and silver Britannia coins, gold and silver Lunar coins, and gold and silver Queen’s Beast coins are all defined as Investment Precious Metals (IPM) by Singapore Customs, and so all of these bullion coins are exempt from Singapore GST.

The Royal Mint also produces the world-famous Gold Sovereign coin, a coin which has been minted in its modern form since 1817 and which has therefore been minted for some 200 years now. The Sovereign is legal tender in the UK with a nominal value of one pound sterling and features the famous imagery of St George slaying a dragon, imagery which was designed by the Italian engraver Benedetto Pistucci for the first modern Sovereign in 1817.

Currently the Mint produces both a Sovereign and a Half Sovereign denomination, however, both of these coins are minted in 22 carat gold, i.e. with a gold fineness of 91.67%. This unfortunately means that the Gold Sovereign does not qualify as IPM under Singapore Customs Rules because qualifying IPM is defined as containing 99.5% pure gold or higher. The Gold Sovereign is thus not currently on the Custom’s list of exempted precious metals coins.

Although there is strong potential interest among BullionStar’s customers in the Gold Sovereign, for most bullion coin buyers the lack of GST exemption currently makes the purchase of Sovereigns uneconomical relative to other bullion coins on the market. It is possible, however, that Singapore Customs may amend its IPM rules in the future as it considers and evaluates the worldwide popularity of the Gold Sovereign or if the Royal Mint raises this issue with Singapore Customs.

Royal Mint Gold Sovereigns

In the meantime, BullionStar does stock a number of Gold Sovereign proof sets, for example, here and here. These sets, which would be of interest to collectors, consist of 4 coins, namely, the Sovereign, the Half Sovereign, the Double Sovereign (twice the weight of the Sovereign with a nominal value of £2) and a very large ‘Five Pound’ Sovereign (5 times the weight and gold content of the Sovereign with a nominal value of £5).

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Limited edition proof Gold Sovereign, 4 coin set, 2003

In total, this set contains 2 troy ounces of gold. This is because the Sovereign has a gold content of 0.2354 troy ounces, the Half Sovereign has a gold content of 0.1177 troy ounces, the Double Sovereign contains 0.4708 troy ounces, and the large ‘Five Pound’ Sovereign contains 1.177 troy ounces of gold, i.e. 0.1177 + 0.2354 + 0.4708 + 1.177 = 2 troy ounces.

Note also that all newly minted batches of Royal Mint coins, including all of the Royal Mint bullion coins discussed above, are also assayed and tested for metal composition, weight and size as part of the long-standing annual Trial of the Pyx held at GoldSmiths Hall in London which is both a practical and traditional quality control exercise that is presided over by the Master of the Mint and the UK Treasury’s Chancellor of the Exchequer. This Trial is a further guarantee that all Royal Mint bullion coins are of the highest possible quality and workmanship.